Cyber Nations Wiki

Editing

Federalism

1
  • The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit. If you are undoing an edit that is …
Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Federalism ''' is the idea of a group or body of members that are bound together (latin: ''foedus'', [[wikipedia:Covenant (disambiguation)|covenant]]) with a governing representative head. That representative head can be a [[wikipedia:monarch|king]] or [[wikipedia:God|God]] (as in theology), or a [[wikipedia:prime minister|prime minister]] or [[wikipedia:general assembly|general assembly]] (as in politics).
+
'''Federalism ''' is the idea of a group or body of members that are bound together (latin: ''foedus'', [[Covenant (disambiguation)|covenant]]) with a governing representative head. That representative head can be a [[monarch|king]] or [[God]] (as in theology), or a [[Thing (assembly)|thing]] or [[general assembly]] (as in politics).
   
 
*'''''In politics''''', federalism is the political philosophy that underlies a system of government in which sovereignty is constitutionally divided between a central governing authority and constituent political units (like states or provinces), creating what is often called a federation. Proponents are often called federalists. In Canada and Europe, "federalist" is often used to describe those who favor a stronger federal government (or European Union government) and weaker provincial governments. The same is historically true in the United States, with those who generally favor a confederation, or weaker federal government and stronger state governments, being called "anti-federalists". However, in recent years in America "federalism" has come to mean something closer to confederacy.
 
*'''''In politics''''', federalism is the political philosophy that underlies a system of government in which sovereignty is constitutionally divided between a central governing authority and constituent political units (like states or provinces), creating what is often called a federation. Proponents are often called federalists. In Canada and Europe, "federalist" is often used to describe those who favor a stronger federal government (or European Union government) and weaker provincial governments. The same is historically true in the United States, with those who generally favor a confederation, or weaker federal government and stronger state governments, being called "anti-federalists". However, in recent years in America "federalism" has come to mean something closer to confederacy.
  Loading editor
Your changes will be visible immediately.
  • For testing, please use the sandbox instead.
  • On talk pages, please sign your comment by typing four tildes (~~~~).